Cooper’s Hawks — Newly Minted (Part II) — Why So Many?

You may enlarge any image in this blog by clicking on it. Click again for a detailed view. Today I’m posting more images of the fledgling Cooper’s Hawks that I photographed recently in a Tucson public park. And I’m asking a question: why are there so many Cooper’s Hawks in

Cooper’s Hawks — Newly Minted (Part I)

You may enlarge any image in this blog by clicking on it. Click again for a detailed view. If someday there is a contest to name Tucson’s “official” bird, I’d vote for the Cooper’s Hawk. These raptors are ubiquitous in Tucson and its adjacent suburbs. It’s no exaggeration for me

Great Blue Heron in a Public Park

You may enlarge any image in this blog by clicking on it. Click again for a detailed view. Tucson features several public parks. The parks have the usual recreational facilities: tennis courts and ball fields. But some also have man-made ponds and streams and at least a few large trees.

Red-tailed Hawk — Calling and Takeoff

You may enlarge any image in this blog by clicking on it. Click again for a detailed view. I never make a foray into southern Arizona’s countryside without seeing at least a handful of Red-tailed Hawks. I could probably devote this entire blog to nothing but Red Tail images and

Tarantula — A Second Backyard Resident

You may enlarge any image in this blog by clicking on it. Click again for a detailed view. A couple of weeks ago, I posted images of a tarantula that resides in our backyard. I expressed a bit of surprise — and disappointment — that so far, this year, I’d

Black-necked Stilt In an Irrigation Pond

You may enlarge any of the images in this blog by clicking on it. Click again for a detailed view. Black-necked Stilts are members of a large family of birds known as plovers. Many plovers are birds associated with shorelines. They make their living by foraging at the margins of

Burrowing Owls — Covering All Bases

You may enlarge any image in this blog by clicking on it. Click again for a detailed view. Speaking of amusing images, here’s one that I especially like; The four juvenile Burrowing Owls in this image almost seem to have been assigned areas to check for possible incoming danger. Burrowing

Black Vultures — “Bob’s Friends Eventually Grew Tired of His Constant Showing Off”

You may enlarge any image in this blog by clicking on it. Click again for a detailed view. Every once in a while I make an image of a scene that strikes me as being inherently amusing. So it is with this image, the caption of which is the title

Black-crowned Night Herons — A Breeding Colony in the Farmlands

You may enlarge any image in this blog by clicking on it. Click again for a detailed view. Southern Arizona’s plains and deserts are filled with incongruities. I constantly run across wildlife that seems to be out of place in our harsh and arid environment but that has adapted to

Western Diamondback Rattlesnake — Hiding in Plain View

You may enlarge any image in this blog by clicking on it. Click again for a detailed view. I recently posted about how some creatures — a tiny crab spider in that post — are masters of camouflage. Today I’m posting about another camouflage artist, a Western Diamondback Rattlesnake, and

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